Wellness Services

As a community driven organization, we are committed to educating the public about the benefits of immunizations. Whether you are here to learn about our flu program for yourself or your facility, our Gardasil program to help prevent HPV and cervical cancer, our Zostavax vaccine program to prevent Shingles, or any other services, we are here to help.

CDC Vaccine Information Statements

Interested in receiving more information about our upcoming clinics, or want to host a clinic at your location? Call or email us today! esi@esimedical.com
Phone: 732-292-0101

Welcome to ESI Medical's online immunization resource center!

As a community driven organization, we are committed to educating the public about the benefits of immunizations. Whether you are here to learn about our flu program for yourself or your facility, our Gardasil program to help prevent HPV and cervical cancer, our Zostavax vaccine program to prevent Shingles, or any other services, we are here to help. Here are some of the services we provide:

Influenza (flu)

Influenza (commonly known as the flu) is easily transmitted from person to person and is one of the leading causes of absenteeism from work. Unlike the common cold, it can leave a person unable to function for several days. Getting an annual vaccination is the best protection from flu and its debilitating affects.

Pneumonia

The pneumonia vaccine prevents bacterial pneumonia, which results from an infection of the lungs. There are more than 200,000 cases of bacterial pneumonia each year in the US alone. One shot usually lasts most people for up to five years.

Meningitis

Bacterial meningitis is the inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. Spread through air droplets or direct contact with an infected individual, it can be fatal to its victims and can strike anyone at anytime. College students living in dormitories or residence halls are four times more likely than the average person to contract the disease. Getting vaccinated is the best chance to avoid the debilitating and sometimes deadly affects of this disease.

Shingles

Shingles is a disease caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you have had chickenpox, the chickenpox virus remains inactive in your body in certain nerves. If the virus does become active again, usually later in life, it causes Shingles. This disease will affect one out of every two people over the age of 85.

HPV

Cervical cancer is cancer of the cervix (the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina). Cervical cancer is caused by certain types of HPV. When a female becomes infected with certain types of HPV and the virus doesn't go away on its own, abnormal cells can develop in the lining of the cervix. If not discovered early and treated, these abnormal cells can become cervical precancers and then cancer. GARDASIL is the only vaccine that may help guard against diseases that are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) Types 6, 11, 16, and 18.

Hepatitis A

The hepatitis A vaccine is given to people who are traveling to parts of the world where hepatitis A virus infections are common. The hepatitis A vaccine is also now recommended for all children living in the United States. The hepatitis A vaccine should be given as a series of two shots - the second administered six to 12 months after the first. Children receiving the first shot should be at least 1 year old.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus. Sexual contact is the most common reason for the spread of HBV infection in the United States. About 1 out of 4 acute HBV infections occur among men who have sex with men. HBV is also spread through needle sticks or sharps exposures on the job and from an infected mother to her baby during birth. Most early childhood spread occurs in households of people with chronic (life-long) HBV infection, but the spread of HBV has also been seen in daycare centers and schools. Hepatitis B vaccine, usually a three-dose series, is recommended for all children 0-18 years of age. All older children who did not get all the recommended doses of hepatitis B vaccine as an infant should complete their vaccine series as soon as possible. Most states require hepatitis B vaccine for school entry.